Poems 1908-1911

Sonnet: "Oh Death will find me long before I tire"

Sonnet: "I said I splendidly loved you; it's not true





The Fish

Thoughts on the Shape of the Human Body


The Hill

The One Before the Last

The Jolly Company

The Life Beyond

Lines Written in the Belief That the Ancient Roman Festival of the Dead Was Called Ambarvalia

Dead Men's Love

Town and Country


Menelaus and Helen



Blue Evening

The Charm



The Voice

Dining-Room Tea

The Goddess in the Wood

A Channel Passage


Day and Night


Poems 1908-1911

Rupert Brooke established his initial public reputation as a poet as a result of the publication of Poems, 1911. He finalised this in a burst of energy at the end of 1911, at the same time as he was writing his fellowship dissertation for King's College, Cambridge.

Poems, 1911, was thought by critics at the time to reveal two of Brooke's strongest character traits: his breadth of interest, and his daring lack of taste. In his review in The Morning Post, Brooke's friend the poet Edward Thomas wrote:

"He is full of revolt, self-contempt, and yet arrogance too. he reveals chiefly what he desires to be and to be thought. Now and then he gives himself away, as when , in three poems close together, he speaks of the scent of warm clover. Copies chould be bought by everyone over forty who has never been under forty. It will be a revelation. Also if they live yet a little longer they may see Mr Rupert Brooke a poet. He will not be a little one."